“Un-american”

“That’s un-american!” Pardon? “Un-american?” I type the word with as much scorn as physically possible. It has no meaning. None. […]
“That’s un-american!” Pardon? “Un-american?” I type the word with as much scorn as physically possible. It has no meaning. None. How could it when the most beautiful thing about America is that anyone can hold any belief and not be discriminated against for it?

Nothing can be un-american if everything is American. Yet people feel the need to create their own convoluted presumptions as to what should and should not be permissibly “American” (often including, but not limited to: McDonalds, dieting, money, the homeless, guns, world peace, blue jeans, bikini tops, and baseball). Those that say, “You must not be an American if you don’t like [insert “American” thing here]” are actually the anti-Americans themselves.

America is illustrious because this is where people don’t see appearances; they see personality, potential, and capacity–where skin color is irrelevant and egalitarianism abundant because everyone has an equal opportunity for success in America. Americans are singularized by multitudes: of people, of beliefs, of hopes, of dreams, and furthermore, by our acceptance and equality for those multitudes. So who is anyone to limit that multitude in any way? To turn America’s back on the very core principle it was founded upon with just one utterance?

There is a reason people leave the homes their ancestors have lived in for decades and move to America. There is a reason America is “the best country in the world.” There is a reason America is synonymous worldwide with liberty and justice for all. That reason is not because someone took something fundamentally American- because everything is American- and deemed it “un-american.”

So, if there is anything that is truly, honest-to-goodness “un-american,” it is dubbing someone or something “un-american.”

 

 


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Hafsa Mansoor

About Hafsa Mansoor

Hafsa Mansoor is an unconventional, tenacious, and candid nerd with a passion for words and hope. She is a senior at Timberland High School. She has a growing infatuation with the justice system and is an aspiring social and political activist for women's rights.