No apologies in the so-called “apology tour”

In tonight’s third 2012 Presidential debate, Governor Romney once again referred to President Obama’s diplomatic tour in Spring 2009 as […]

In tonight’s third 2012 Presidential debate, Governor Romney once again referred to President Obama’s diplomatic tour in Spring 2009 as an “apology tour.” He rebuked Obama for “criticizing America” and went on to say:

Mr. President, the reason I call it an apology tour is because you went to the Middle East and you flew to — to Egypt and to Saudi Arabia and to — to Turkey and Iraq. And — and by way, you skipped Israel, our closest friend in the region, but you went to the other nations. And by the way, they noticed that you skipped Israel. And then in those nations and on Arabic TV you said that America had been dismissive and derisive. You said that on occasion America had dictated to other nations. Mr. President, America has not dictated to other nations. We have freed other nations from dictators.

I visited the transcript of President Obama’s interview with Al-Arabiya news network as well as the transcript of his June 4th, 2009 address to the Muslim world from Cairo. Word searches for “dismissive” and “derisive” yielded no results from either text. Variations on the word “dictate” appeared once in each transcript, although one could hardly characterize the use of the word as an apology for US foreign policy.

When asked by Al-Arabiya’s Hisham Melhem about how he would see his “personal role” in facilitating peacemaking between the Palestinians and the Israelis, President Obama divulged the advice he offered George Mitchell, his personal envoy to the Middle East.

And so what I told him is start by listening, because all too often the United States starts by dictating — in the past on some of these issues — and we don’t always know all the factors that are involved. So let’s listen. He’s going to be speaking to all the major parties involved. And he will then report back to me. From there we will formulate a specific response.

Apology or strategy? You can be the judge. In his Cairo speech, entitled “A New Beginning” used the word “dictating” not to apologize for US policy but to defend religious freedom:

Freedom of religion is central to the ability of peoples to live together. We must always examine the ways in which we protect it. For instance, in the United States, rules on charitable giving have made it harder for Muslims to fulfill their religious obligation. That is why I am committed to working with American Muslims to ensure that they can fulfill zakat.

Likewise, it is important for Western countries to avoid impeding Muslim citizens from practicing religion as they see fit – for instance, by dictating what clothes a Muslim woman should wear. We cannot disguise hostility towards any religion behind the pretense of liberalism.

Obama’s speech in Cairo laid out a beautiful dream of peace for the Middle East and the world. He focused on global similarities across cultures and religions, rather than re-enforcing our differences. He apologized for nothing.

So long as our relationship is defined by our differences, we will empower those who sow hatred rather than peace, and who promote conflict rather than the cooperation that can help all of our people achieve justice and prosperity. This cycle of suspicion and discord must end.

I have come here to seek a new beginning between the United States and Muslims around the world; one based upon mutual interest and mutual respect; and one based upon the truth that America and Islam are not exclusive, and need not be in competition. Instead, they overlap, and share common principles – principles of justice and progress; tolerance and the dignity of all human beings.

I do so recognizing that change cannot happen overnight. No single speech can eradicate years of mistrust, nor can I answer in the time that I have all the complex questions that brought us to this point. But I am convinced that in order to move forward, we must say openly the things we hold in our hearts, and that too often are said only behind closed doors. There must be a sustained effort to listen to each other; to learn from each other; to respect one another; and to seek common ground.

President Obama continued in this same speech to tactfully defend the US invasion of Iraq, while admitting that war is not always the answer.

Let me also address the issue of Iraq. Unlike Afghanistan, Iraq was a war of choice that provoked strong differences in my country and around the world. Although I believe that the Iraqi people are ultimately better off without the tyranny of Saddam Hussein, I also believe that events in Iraq have reminded America of the need to use diplomacy and build international consensus to resolve our problems whenever possible. Indeed, we can recall the words of Thomas Jefferson, who said: “I hope that our wisdom will grow with our power, and teach us that the less we use our power the greater it will be.

President Obama even touted our country’s strong relationship with Israel while addressing the Muslim world.

America’s strong bonds with Israel are well known. This bond is unbreakable. It is based upon cultural and historical ties, and the recognition that the aspiration for a Jewish homeland is rooted in a tragic history that cannot be denied.

Around the world, the Jewish people were persecuted for centuries, and anti-Semitism in Europe culminated in an unprecedented Holocaust. Tomorrow, I will visit Buchenwald, which was part of a network of camps where Jews were enslaved, tortured, shot and gassed to death by the Third Reich. Six million Jews were killed – more than the entire Jewish population of Israel today. Denying that fact is baseless, ignorant, and hateful. Threatening Israel with destruction – or repeating vile stereotypes about Jews – is deeply wrong, and only serves to evoke in the minds of Israelis this most painful of memories while preventing the peace that the people of this region deserve.

Ahem, Romney, while he may not have gone to Israel on this tour, he did meet with Netanyahu in May 2009 and visited a concentration camp immediately after his speech in Cairo.

On the subject of a two state solution, Obama said the following:

That is in Israel’s interest, Palestine’s interest, America’s interest, and the world’s interest. That is why I intend to personally pursue this outcome with all the patience that the task requires. The obligations that the parties have agreed to under the Road Map are clear. For peace to come, it is time for them – and all of us – to live up to our responsibilities.

The only thing Obama should be apologizing for is not walking the talk by following through with his idealistic intentions to coordinate peace talks between Israeli and Palestinian parties.

America will align our policies with those who pursue peace, and say in public what we say in private to Israelis and Palestinians and Arabs. We cannot impose peace. But privately, many Muslims recognize that Israel will not go away. Likewise, many Israelis recognize the need for a Palestinian state. It is time for us to act on what everyone knows to be true.

Too many tears have flowed. Too much blood has been shed. All of us have a responsibility to work for the day when the mothers of Israelis and Palestinians can see their children grow up without fear; when the Holy Land of three great faiths is the place of peace that God intended it to be; when Jerusalem is a secure and lasting home for Jews and Christians and Muslims, and a place for all of the children of Abraham to mingle peacefully together as in the story of Isra, when Moses, Jesus, and Mohammed (peace be upon them) joined in prayer.

Had Governor Romney wanted my vote, he could have resurrected this sentiment and brought peace talks back to the US foreign policy agenda… in addition to changing his position on, oh wait, almost everything.

To anybody in need of a dose of idealism and hope for peace, I highly recommend reading the full text of President Obama’s speech, A New Beginning.”

“We have the power to make the world we seek, but only if we have the courage to make a new beginning, keeping in mind what has been written.

The Holy Koran tells us, “O mankind! We have created you male and a female; and we have made you into nations and tribes so that you may know one another.”

The Talmud tells us: “The whole of the Torah is for the purpose of promoting peace.”

The Holy Bible tells us, “Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called sons of God.”

The people of the world can live together in peace. We know that is God’s vision. Now, that must be our work here on Earth. Thank you. And may God’s peace be upon you.”


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Nicole Lopez

About Nicole Lopez

Nicole Lopez is a recent graduate of Washington University, with a degree in Arabic language and literature. She currently works in Chicago, shaking her head at the outrageous state of politics in the nation.